Kilian Evang (@texttheater)

Bilk, Düsseldorf

The below is an off-site archive of all tweets posted by @texttheater ever

May 16th, 2018

hllizi Which is cool when you're in love with the status quo. Being which is the essence of conservatism, if the term has a meaning. twitter.com/defsophiaray/s…

via Twitter Lite (retweeted on 9:12 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

Word of the day: predisinclination

via Twitter for Android

KevinFarzad The most important thing I've learned in life, and I can't stress this enough: you gotta make a salad in a bigger bowl than you think

via Twitter for iPhone (retweeted on 7:34 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter for Android)

JoLendle @EnglishGibson „ihrem“ - winzige, praktisch unsichtbare Neigung des Kopfes zur Seite, in Richtung einer imaginierten Dritten
„Ihrem“ - winzige, praktisch unsichtbare Neigung des Kopfes nach vorne, in Richtung des Gegenübers

via Twitter for iPhone (retweeted on 7:33 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter for Android)

childs_jessie Glorious snippet of two ladies at an 80th bday party:

'I like to keep the brain going with Sudoku.'
'Do you dear? I find it frightfully dull after Bletchley.'

via Twitter for iPhone (retweeted on 3:04 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter for Android)

ojahnn Today's round of @rewordable contained the transformations
* TEST -> LATEST
* CAN -> CYAN
* BEER -> BEARER
I love morphology, and what I love most about is avoiding it :)

via Twitter for Android (retweeted on 3:04 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter for Android)

@hllizi Also, wenn in "Ein Hund läuft einer Katze nach und die Katze einer Maus" "die Katze einer Maus" eine Phrase ist, bin ich on board.

via Twitter Web Client in reply to hllizi

hllizi Das ist überhaupt nicht wahr.

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 2:38 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

hllizi LOL

"In fact, the possibility of conjunction offers one of the best criteria
for the initial determination of phrase structure."

(Chomsky, Syntactic Structures)

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 2:38 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

bundesamtfvs Die bayrische Polizei hat jetzt mehr Rechte als die sächsische.

via TweetDeck (retweeted on 2:13 PM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

_roryturnbull My hunch is that "spectral listeners" are more likely to have the "yanny" percept, while "f0 listeners" are more likely to have the "laurel" percept. (You can see our missing fundamentals paper here: www2.hawaii.edu/~rory9/papers/… ) /9

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 9:50 AM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

_roryturnbull The big question is why do some people hear one and not the other, and why is it so hard to flip? Part of this is likely due to audio hardware - laptop speakers, fancy headphones, cheap headphones, background noise - but I think there's a cognitive dimension too. /6

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 9:50 AM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

_roryturnbull The fall of the F2 between the two syllables is then consistent with an /n/, although we don't see the general amplitude dampening that we normally associate with nasals. The F2 rises and F1 falls again at the end, resulting in /jæni/ overall. /4

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 9:50 AM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

_roryturnbull But what if we treat that higher spectral prominence as an F2, rather than an F3? Then we have a very high F2 in the first syllable, consistent with a front vowel or approximant, e.g. /j/. The F2 stays pretty high and the F1 gradually rises, giving a percept of /jæ/. /3

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 9:50 AM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)

_roryturnbull Okay, this is a pretty amazing auditory illusion. Here's what I think is going on. In the first syllable, there's only one major spectral peak below 2.5kHz. It has a wide bandwidth, which is consistent with an F1 and F2 very close together: an /ɑ/ (for "Laurel"). /1 twitter.com/janesolomon/st…

via Twitter Web Client (retweeted on 9:49 AM, May 16th, 2018 via Twitter Web Client)